Ben R. Fortson

M, ID# 21851, b. 1874, d. 20 August 1962
  • Other Names*: Ben Fortson.

Additional Resources

• His Find A Grave memorial, which includes a picture of his tombstone, is here.
  • Last Edited: 25 Feb 2018

Family: Nettie Rilla Ethridge b. 31 Jan 1874, d. 27 Sep 1967

Citations

  1. [S1416] Hattiesburg American, Hattiesburg, Miss., online at http://www.newspapers.com, 29 Sep 1967, p. 2, col. 6 (obituary of Mrs. B. R. Fortson) (describing her as the widow of B. R. Fortson).
  2. [S1417] The Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Miss., online at http://www.newspapers.com, 29 Sep 1967, p. 12, col. 3 (obituary of Mrs. B. R. Fortson) (describing her as the widow of B. R. Fortson).
  3. [S961] Find A Grave, online at http://www.findagrave.com, memorial for Ben R. Fortson, memorial no. 46408021, viewed on 25 Feb 2018.
  4. [S961] Find A Grave, online, above, memorial for Ben R. Fortson, memorial no. 46408021, viewed on 25 Feb 2018 (giving the year but no other information).
  5. [S1416] Hattiesburg American, Hattiesburg, Miss., above, 20 Aug 1962, p. 8, col. 6 (obituary of B. R. Fortson).
  6. [S961] Find A Grave, online, above, memorial for Ben R. Fortson, memorial no. 46408021, viewed on 25 Feb 2018 (not giving the date).

William Naudain Bell

M, ID# 21852, b. 1897, d. 27 May 1971
  • Birth*: He was born in 1897.1
  • Death*: He died on 27 May 1971.2,3
  • Other Names*: William Bell.

Additional Resources

• His Find A Grave memorial, which includes a picture of his tombstone, is here.
  • Last Edited: 26 Feb 2018

Citations

  1. [S961] Find A Grave, online at http://www.findagrave.com, memorial for William N. Bell, memorial no. 114134916, viewed on 26 Feb 2018.
  2. [S961] Find A Grave, online, above, memorial for William N. Bell, memorial no. 114134916, viewed on 26 Feb 2018 (giving the year but no other information).
  3. [S1365] The Sun, Baltimore, Md., online at http://www.newspapers.com, 29 May 1971, p. 26 (obituary of William Naudain Bell).

John Naudain

M, ID# 21853
  • Scrapbook*: • "LOCAL BREVITIES
       "—John Naudain, a soldier of Troop B, First cavalry, who is home on a furlough visiting his relatives in South Haven, was in town last Thursday. His command was in the hottest of the fighting at Santiago, and he has many interesting stories to tell of the incidents of that memorable struggle. Two colored regiments formed a part of his division, and he says there were no braver men in the whole army than those black troopers showed themselves to be. The Rough Riders also fought near him and fourth well, Colonel Roosevelt especially distinguished himself by his almost reckless bravery. Mr. Naudain was wounded in the breast during the assault on San Juan hill, but was able to keep his place in the ranks. Exposure in the trenches, however, brought on an attack of fever, from which he did not recover until after the regiment had reached Montauk Point, when he was granted a sick leave. He has served eight years with the regulars, and likes the service well enough to stay with it."
    • "John Naudain of Troop B, First cavalry, regular army, arrived home Saturday night from Montauk Point, L.I., on a thirty days’ furlough. John is looking hale and hearty now, but says he has been through the rubbers, and was just dismissed from the hospital and sent off on a furlough to recuperate. John was in the fiercest of the fighting at Santiago. Troop B fought side by side with Roosevelt’s Rough Riders and the wo colored regiments in the capture of San Juan. He says the boys all swear by Generals Roosevelt and Wheeler, who were right with the boys all through the fighting, riding up and down the firing line and encouraging them with words of cheer and commendation. John, like all the regular army boys, keenly feels the disposition manifested by the public to laud and praise the volunteers and pass the regulars by with little or no notice when the fact of the matter is that the regulars stood the brunt of the battle before Santiago. After the surrender of Santiago he says the Spaniards came into their lines and mixed with them freely without manifesting any apparent grudge, and traded trinkets for bacon and hardtack, of which they had plenty and to spare. He laid by a great collection of relics which he is daily expecting to arrive. South Haven feels proud of the fact that it had one soldier boy in this famous battle and that he acquitted himself with credit."1,2
  • Last Edited: 9 Mar 2018

Citations

  1. [S1419] The Monitor-Press, Wellington, Kan., online at http://www.newspapers.com, 15 Sep 1898, p. 1, col. 4 (first bullet).
  2. [S1420] People's Voice, Wellington, Kan., online at http://www.newspapers.com, 15 Sep 1898, p. 7, cols. 3-4 (second bullet).