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  • Richard Easton Adams served one term, 1886-1887, as a member of the Georgia House of Representatives.
  • William Harrison Harper Adams was sheriff of Elbert County, Georgia in 1869-1878 and was known as "Sheriff Bill."
  • Willis B. Adams served two terms, 1905-1908, as a member of the Georgia House of Representatives. He also was mayor of Elberton, Georgia for six years.
  • Jesse Marshall ('J.M.') Bartlett was, when he died in 1922 at age 80, thought to have lived in Navarro County, Texas longer than any person then living.
  • Joseph Bartlett was said to have been "a man of domestic habits and [a man who] did not even visit the neighboring city of Saint Louis [Missouri], though it was less than twenty-five miles distant, for forty-four years previous to his death on January 1, 1864. The horse ferry had just been established about the time of his first trip there in 1819, and his surviving friends state that, having but little curiosity for new or strange things, he never went to see a steamboat or railroad during his life, preferring to devote his whole time to domestic affairs and his books."
  • John Junior Bell served in the Texas House of Representatives (1937-1947), the Texas Senate (1947-1954), and the U.S. House of Representatives (1955-1957).
  • Benjamin T. Biggs was governor of Delaware from 1887 to 1891.
  • Robert Booth was a physician living at Belle Ville in Gloucester County, Virginia. At his death in 1657, at about age 47, his estate included 23,000 bricks, valued at 184 shillings,
  • James Nathan Browning was lieutenant governor of Texas from 1899 to 1903,
  • Joseph Alvey Clayton was elected to the secession convention and signed the Texas Ordinance of Secession that led to its secession from the United States in 1861.
  • Charles John Fortson patented a railway train coupling device in the late Nineteenth Century but never marketed it.
  • Hugh Gallemore was an early commercial aviator and was the forty-second employee of American Airlines.
  • William Earl Irick, Jr. was awarded a purple heart medal in World War II.
  • Beauford Halbert Jester was a lawyer who held many political and professional offices, including governor of Texas from 1947 to 1949. He is the only Texas governor to die in office.
  • George Taylor Jester held several political offices, including member of the Texas House of Representatives and of the Texas Senate, and was elected to two terms as governor, in 1894 and 1896. He was a founder of Southern Methodist University.
  • Harry Obadiah Knight was once called the world's greatest anatomist
  • Obadiah Woodson Knight was a pioneer resident of Dallas County, Texas, arriving in 1846. An elementary school in the Dallas Independent School District is named for him.
  • Eliza Naudain Corbit Lea was first lady of Delaware from 1905 to 1909.
  • Preston Lea was governor of Delaware from 1905 to 1909.
  • John Loop built the first courthouse for Henderson County, Texas, in 1850, for which he was paid $50, plus $15 for a chimney made of sticks and dirt.
  • Isabella (Woolls) Naudain was a passenger on the first train in the United States and danced with Vice President Martin Van Buren at a White House ball.
  • Juda Louisa (Bartlett) Neill and her first husband, John C. Neill, were divorced in 1842, not by court order but by act of the congress of the Republic of Texas.
  • Thomas Jefferson Rusk was secretary of war of the Republic of Texas, chief justice of the Republic, and one of the two initial members of the U.S. Senate from Texas when it gained statehood. A county, a city, and some public schools in Texas are named for him.
  • German Walker held several political offices in Simpson County, Mississippi and Navarro County, Texas before and after the Civil War. He came close to being wounded or killed several times during his service in the Confederate army, including an instance in which a bullet hit his cap.
  • David Elam Waters, Jr. had a daughter, Reba, who had a role in the "Wagon Train" television series.